Sources

  1. Episode 3: Why War Zones Need Science Too

    Episode 3: Why War Zones Need Science Too

    Undaunted by Yemen’s civil war, National Geographic explorer Ella Al-Shamahi searches on the island of Socotra for traces of the earliest known humans to leave Africa.

  2. A new sensation: recording and reproducing taste

    A new sensation: recording and reproducing taste

    Meiji University scientist has found a way to reproduce taste, just as we’ve long been able to do for sight and sound.

  3. Go island-hopping in Palawan, the Philippines

    Go island-hopping in Palawan, the Philippines

    With a dazzling array of activities and safety protocols in place, this leafy archipelago could be a good option for a “new normal” getaway.

  4. U.S. has secured 200 million more doses of COVID-19 vaccines

    U.S. has secured 200 million more doses of COVID-19 vaccines

    These are the COVID-19 vaccine prospects that have made it to phase three trials and beyond.

  5. Can robots help keep us safe?

    Can robots help keep us safe?

    Automated machines are increasingly common—here’s where you might see them next.

  6. How these feuding map-makers shaped our fascination with Mars

    How these feuding map-makers shaped our fascination with Mars

    One was an artist who loved space. His rival was a bold professional astronomer. Their race to map the red planet sparked decades of science and speculation.

  7. Why mapping Mars completely changed how we see it

    Why mapping Mars completely changed how we see it

    Mars has drawn our attention for millennia, and it was when we started mapping the planet that we began to see it as a place, and a destination. Early mapmaking led to scientific discoveries—and a few far-fetched theories—which changed how we see the planet today.

  8. Bonus Episode: In Conversation: Reframing Black History and Culture

    Bonus Episode: In Conversation: Reframing Black History and Culture

    National Geographic presents In Conversation, a special podcast episode featuring explorer Tara Roberts, computer scientist Gloria Washington, and photographer Ruddy Roye. Through their dynamic work across maritime archeology, artificial intelligence, and photojournalism, they’re determined to reimagine Black history.

  9. Families are leading a new wave in Black travel. Here’s why

    Families are leading a new wave in Black travel. Here’s why

    For many parents, showing their kids the world is about both the past and the future.

  10. 3-ton parts of Stonehenge may have been carried from earlier monuments

    3-ton parts of Stonehenge may have been carried from earlier monuments

    Years of archaeological research now suggest that Neolithic Britons lugged massive elements of the iconic monument from far-flung reaches of the island.